15 Web Developer Portfolio List ✯✯✯✯✯ in 2022

Design portfolios to Inspire You!

➡ Where can I find good Ideas?
➡ Where to get Inspiration?
➡ Where can I ask a Question?
➡ Where can I hire Developers for my App Idea?
➡ Tips to make own HOT Portfolio

Where to find Website Developer:

  • Upwork is a marketplace for freelancers. Highly recommended for web developers.
  • Clutch List of Web Development Company with truthful Reviews.
  • Freelancer is a marketplace for all types of freelance positions, including web designers, graphic designers, etc.
  • Fiverr is the largest freelance services marketplace.
  • Craigslist worldwide job-board to find graphic designers.
  • How To Find a Good Web Designer?

Web Developers, You Want to Work within 2021

Do you want to be on this List?

Apply Now! [for 2.99 USD]

1. Sharon Yi

When you scroll through Sharon Yi’s portfolio you immediately get a sense of her personality through the playful color palette and addition of emojis. Sharon is currently working at Indigo as a Front-End Developer and the projects section on her website showcases the interactive and creative web development work that she’s capable of!

Coming from a background in design, I love creating pages where I’m able to actually create enjoyable interactions and experiences for everyone! And with Juno’s education and support, I’m now able to truly call myself a Front-End Developer who is currently working at Indigo!

➡ Load Web Portfolio Example or Looking TOP Promo Websites.

2. Rafael Caferati

Caferati.me

What Rafael does: Full Stack Web Developer and UI/UX Javascript specialist.
Type: Private. Location: London, England

Rafael`s Portfolio

Where can i find Portfolio Template to Showcase my Skills and Get dream tech job?

More than 50 Fresh Templates for creative personal web development portfolios:

3. Robin Mastromari

Robin Mastromarino

Expert in: UI / UX Designer at HETIC
Type: Private. Location: Paris

4. Ian Lunn

ianlunn.co.uk

Expert in: Producing HQ responsive websites and exceptional UX
Type: Private. Location: Devon, UK

5. Timmy O’Mahony

timmyomahony.com

What Timmy does: Full-Stack Web & Software Development
Type: Private. Location: Dublin, Ireland.

6. Pierre Nel

pierre.io

Expert in: UX/UI Design, full-stack development
Type: Private. Location: London, UK
Star Trek Fan

7. Richard Hill

Richard-hill.org.uk

About: creative freelance digital designer
Type: Private. Location: Leeds, UK

Day rate is £450

8. Ben Adam

benadam.me

a Designer / Front End Developer
Type: Privat. Location: Tempe, AZ, USA
Currently not accepting freelance work.

9. Daniel Fischer

www.danielfischer.com

Expert in: Pocket CTO for Project
Type: Private. Location: San Francisco, California

10. Kay Evans-Stocks

Kay Evans-Stocks is a creative developer and graphic designer that’s passionate about building digital experiences that nurture community, inclusivity, and knowledge. For each project she’s worked on, Kay’s taken the time to put the spotlight on the organization she worked with, while highlighting the project goals. When you browse her portfolio you immediately get a feel for her creative design approach and the work that she’s capable of!

I am a creative designer and developer, who aims to work with small businesses and marginalized communities to bring their passions to life. I offer both design and development services of web applications or websites!

Expert in: Design Engineer at Tucows
Type: Private.
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

* Marek Kaleta currently out of order

MrkPortfolio.pl

Expert in: digital/graphic design, UI/UX
Type: Private. Location: Warshaw, Poland

Bonus: WordPress Developers Portfolio:

* Emily Ridge

www.Emilyridge.ie

Expert in: custom WordPress developer and designer
Type: Private. Location: Salthill, Galway, Ireland


Front End Developers Portfolio:

* Jack Jeznach (Awwwords Winner)

JacekJeznach.com

What he does: front-end and WordPress development

Mees Verberne

https://Meesverberne.com/

What he does: creative front-end development and design

Describing himself as a highly-creative, front-end developer and designer, Mees Verberne makes use of glitching, to give the site some extra character. He also uses banded gradients that give the look of a gentle lighting.


UI Developers Portfolio:

* Matt Farley

Mattfarley.ca

Expert in: UX/UI and front-end development
Type: Private. Location: Abbotsford, British Columbia.

* Adham Dannaway

What he does: UX/UI Designer & FB Developer — adhamdannaway.com


Disclaimer

Really feel the inspiration for starting a career in the field of web development, only at your own risk. If you could not find inspiration from the portfolios above, pay attention to such resources.

How to Increase your Website Designer Offers? Just add your portfolio to this list here (fee is 5 EUR)!

What is Bubble Website & App Builder and Why It Can Substitute Custom Website?

Bubble is another website builder or web development constructor that makes possible “programming without coding”. Since the success of WordPress and its many counterparts like Joomla, Wix and Magento, website builders became a niche of software products that offer a certain kind of standardized CMS system to present content on the web and many templates to make it look different (for which you pay additionally). That’s too good to be true and it’s not by chance that most business owners and startups prefer custom software development to the deployment of any website constructor or software builder.

Proceed with further reading to know more about the obvious downsides of Bubble software and the many benefits of custom web software that can serve your needs much more efficiently.

Bubble software allows making apps as well because the digital world has shifted towards smartphones and tablets and it no longer gravitates around the desktop. However, builders like Bubble deprive your product of the only thing that can make it successful – originality. Your possible variety of design choices and features is very limited and whatever little you save doesn’t pay off because you lose your brand authenticity in the process.

And for every possible product out there you can be sure to find dozens of competitors. Who becomes successful? Those that clients notice among a myriad of other businesses. 

Custom is Always Better

Using a blueprint to build anything automatically means that the final design won’t be original and authentic. To stick out in the era of sophisticated marketing and frivolous consumerism it is absolutely necessary to be unique. If you start a project with “do it simple” and “do it cheap” objectives in mind, it will be detected by Google algorithms and your possible clients that always feel in their gut, whether you deserve their attention (and money) or not.

A custom solution gives more space for creative input and interesting choices simply because it is implied that the final project itself is the sum of such inputs and choices. This is work that is going to be respected for the sake of it. Putting in real work means showing effort and without effort there’s no respect from the users/clients to wait for. That is why a website or an app made with Bubble or any other constructor is destined to fail in a highly competitive environment. 

How Can Bubble Software Be Useful?

As one developer has put it, paradoxically, Bubble software can be effective in saving a lot of time and effort for developers but it is not marketed to them. Instead, it is promoted to be used by business owners and digital startups that seek a profound online presence. And it is useless for them. So the ones who really need Bubble (to cut down the astounding 25% of routine programming) to simplify coding are not considered a target audience while those that won’t really benefit from it are bought with the premise of “getting software without code”. 

Like Framer or WordPress that can substitute certain blocs of your website or help with design and content management, Bubble software can be effective in reducing time it takes coding the front-end but what it absolutely cannot do is to substitute the development entirely. And with a bright idea in mind some features offered by Bubble can, on the contrary, limit your possibilities. 

Bubble Features

  • DEVELOP – Build any web app with no code.
  • DESIGN – Harness total design freedom.
  • HOST – Scale with robust, hosted infrastructure.
  • GROW – Expand, engage, measure.
  • COLLABORATE – Share the workload.

Disadvantages of Bubble.io

Websites and apps built with Bubble software or other constructors are generally slower (because every feature is a plugin or an extension).

When you write custom code for a feature, everything works faster because the underlying engineering underneath your core processes is developed to behave optimally fast and as efficiently as possible. Every software engineer designs a specific approach and makes a unique process that are exclusively suitable for a certain task at hand. Due to that you can save milliseconds on features and summed up they’re gonna result in a significant rise in speed. 

Speed matters and there’s nothing that causes more outrage than slow connection. That’s why people buy newer phones with more RAM, build 5G networks and optimize every little thing in their lives to always move faster. This is the philosophy of progress and innovation. If you want to succeed, be faster. The faster, the better. Keep in mind that every millisecond here or millisecond there matters on the internet.

Wrapping Up

So, do you really want your business to depend on some third-party software provider? This is too big a risk to allow, since even a slightest discrepancy in your web platform or a mobile app can ruin the journey for your customers.

Even Google and Facebook frequently face downtime, so anything can happen to Bubble, putting to risk everybody, whose business depends on this software provider. When you have your own custom-developed software, you control the situation and have a much bigger number of opportunities to improve, update and upgrade your platform.

Bubble software is no match to it. And the choice is up to you.

Bubble October 2021 UX Update:

Honestly, it was intuitively hard to put together anything sane in Bubble before, and now this. The interaction of containers and content in it is complete crap. Attempts to redesign even the simplest screen cause despair attacks from the fact that the elements generally fly as and where they want, and your past suffering is devalued. It’s a shame to go through all that chaos for the sake of a template or MVP. I don’t plan to use Bubble at all, ever. It’s easier to hire someone to do the MVP for you, or have the code do everything humanly.

Web Design vs. Web Development: Differences to Help You Choose The Right One

Web Design vs Web Development, What’s the Difference Between the Two?

Whether you want to build a new website from scratch or you just want to update your current website, you might be wondering if you need the services of a web designer or a website developer. 

Nowadays, the terms are even used so interchangeably that it’s easy to get them confused. This can lead to employing the wrong strategy in building your website. 

So when you need a specific service for your website, it’s crucial you know whether you need a web design service or a web development service.

Well guess what? that’s what this article is about.

In this article, we’ll be discussing the differences between Web Design vs Web Development and we’ll help you decide when to choose each one for your projects.

So keep on reading this article.

WHAT IS WEB DESIGN?

Web design refers to the visual or aesthetic appearance of your website and how the different components add up to create a user-friendly environment for your business on the internet.

Think of web designers as architects of a building. As an architect would create the plan of a building before building it, so will a web designer model the layout of a website before the developer can start developing it. 

In essence, web design is concerned with everything that has to do with the visual appearance of a website and how users can interact with it. This includes components such as color, theme, graphic, content, and everything else that relates to the visual aspects of the user interface (UI) & user experience (UX).

In simple terms, web design focuses on how a site looks and how users interact with it. Web design governs what users see on their computer screens or mobile devices when they visit your site. A good web designer must be able to use the principles and tools of web design to create a site that looks great and appeals to your target audience. This is because if they like what they see, they’re probably going to stick around.

It might interest you to know that about 73% of businesses today are investing in web design to gain an edge over their competition.

So hiring a good web design company would help you reach your business goals by generating more leads or improving your online sales.

A web designer isn’t concerned with building your website from scratch, rather, they use design programs to create a prototype of your homepage and unique internal pages. This gives you a big picture of how your website would look like and also serve as a building block for developers when they get to building your website.

Some of the design programs used by web designers include Adobe Photoshop, Sketch, GIMP, Figma, Canva, bootstrap, Weebly, etc. 

Also, the design phase of your website allows you to provide feedback about the design and tell your designer what you like, what you don’t like, and the changes you’d like to effect on the current mockup.

WHAT IS WEB DEVELOPMENT?

Having talked about web design, let’s see what web development is all about.

After completing the planning and design process of your website, a web developer, often called a programmer, steps in to make the design function as it should. 

So if the designer is the architect, then the developer is the engineer.

Web developers build a functional website from the design made by the web designer. They make the design prototype of a website come to life and function as a website.

Developers add interactive functionality to your website, whether it be live active links, CTA buttons, or sliders.

For instance, if a design features 2 CTA buttons on the homepage, those CTA buttons have to be hard-coded into the site in such a way that they respond correctly when users click on them. The same goes for every other element in the website such as contact forms, a simple hyperlink in your content, sliders, or even the navigation bar.

Web developers may choose to work with content management systems (CMSs) like Joomla or WordPress, but they’re also able to build your website from scratch by coding with programming languages such as HTML, PHP, and CSS.

So if you need a website or plan to update an already existing website that require people to register and create profiles or collect leads, then you need a web developer.

Note that there are two subcategories of web development; Front end (client-side) and back end (service side) development.

FRONT END DEVELOPMENT is the practice of producing HTML, JAVASCRIPT, OR CSS code for a website or a web application to enable users interact with them directly. Front end development is all about what the user can see on the website like the graphic user interface including beautiful sliders, flashy buttons, navigation buttons, colourful images, etc.

Now since a web designer doesn’t know much about coding, it becomes the role of a front end developer to create an environment that the user can see and touch, by combining several tools including HTML, CSS, and JAVASCRIPT.

WHAT IS BACK END?

This is simply the part of the website which the user cannot see and interact with. It’s all about how to system works. 

The back end runs on the server side but communicates with the front end so that everything works out fine. Essentially, back end developers control the server data and request by coding on the web servers and databases, and not on the browser. 

So a website where users submit forms with personal data (such as creating an account), or saving an article for a blog would require back end services.

On the other hand, fullstack developers are well versed in both frontend and backend development. They’re the complete package when it comes to web development.

WEB DESIGN vs WEB DEVELOPMENT

If you need a new website for your online business or you just want to tweak the look and feel of your current website, you might be wondering if you need a superb web design or a fantastic web development service. Our table below will give you a quick overview on when to choose each one;

ProjectWhat You Need
Build a website using the design from a website designerWeb development
Create an appropriate color pattern for your websiteWeb design
Create a wireframe to suit your existing web design IdeasWeb design
Choose the right fonts for your new or existing websiteWeb design
Create a mobile appWeb development
Fix server/hosting issuesWeb development
Edit visual content like photos and videosWeb design

Hiring Web Design and Web Development Company

Since we’ve grouped the two disciplines into separate categories, it’s easy to think you’ll have to hire Web design company and development company separately. But that’s not true.

If you’re like most business owners, you don’t have the time to juggle client emails, paperwork, and creating a website, an agency full of experts is a great solution.

We can’t wait to get your web design and development off to a flying start.

Comparison of Open Source Web Crawlers for Data Mining and Web Scraping: TOP3 Pros&Cons

The Best open-source Web Crawling Frameworks in 2021

In my search for a suitable back-end crawler for my startup, I looked at many open source solutions. After some initial research, I narrowed the choice down to the 10 systems that seemed to be the most mature and widely used: 

  • Scrapy (Python), 
  • Heritrix (Java),
  • Apache Nutch (Java),
  • Web-Harvest (Java),
  • MechanicalSoup (Python), 
  • Apify SDK (JavaScript),
  • Jaunt (Java),
  • Node-crawler (JavaScript),
  • PySpider (Python), 
  • StormCrawler (Java).

What is the best open source Web Crawler that is very scalable and fast?

As a starting point I wanted the crawler services of choice to satisfy the properties described in Web crawling and Indexes:

  • Robustness: The Web contains servers that create spider traps, which are generators of web pages that mislead crawlers into getting stuck fetching an infinite number of pages in a particular domain. Crawlers must be designed to be resilient to such traps. Not all such traps are malicious; some are the inadvertent side-effect of faulty website development.
  • Politeness: Web servers have both implicit and explicit policies regulating the rate at which a crawler can visit them. These politeness policies must be respected.
  • Distributed: The crawler should have the ability to execute in a distributed fashion across multiple machines.
  • Scalable: The crawler architecture should permit scaling up the crawl rate by adding extra machines and bandwidth.
  • Performance and efficiency: The crawl system should make efficient use of various system resources including processor, storage and network band- width.
  • Freshness: In many applications, the crawler should operate in continuous mode: it should obtain fresh copies of previously fetched pages. A search engine crawler, for instance, can thus ensure that the search engine’s index contains a fairly current representation of each indexed web page. For such continuous crawling, a crawler should be able to crawl a page with a frequency that approximates the rate of change of that page.
  • Quality: Given that a significant fraction of all web pages are of poor utility for serving user query needs, the crawler should be biased towards fetching “useful” pages first.
  • Extensible: Crawlers should be designed to be extensible in many ways — to cope with new data formats, new fetch protocols, and so on. This demands that the crawler architecture be modular.
Table: comparison of TOP 3 open source crawlers in
terms of various parameters (IJSER)

I also had a wish list of additional features that would be nice to have. Instead of just being scalable I wanted to the crawler to be dynamically scalable, so that I could add and remove machines during continuous web crawls. I also wanted to the crawler to be able to export data into a variety of storage backends or data pipelines like Amazon S3, HDFS, or Kafka.

Focused vs. Broad Crawling

Before getting into the meat of the comparison let’s take a step back and look at two different use cases for web crawlers: Focused crawls and broad crawls.

In a focused crawl you are interested in a specific set of pages (usually a specific domain). For example, you may want to crawl all product pages on amazon.com. In a broad crawl the set of pages you are interested in is either very large or unlimited and spread across many domains. That’s usually what search engines are doing. This isn’t a black and white distinction. It’s a continuum. A focused crawl with many domains (or multiple focused crawls performed simultaneously) will essentially approach the properties of a broad crawl.

Now, why is this important? Because focused crawls have a different bottleneck than broad crawls.

When crawling one domain (such as amazon.com) you are essentially limited by your politeness policy. You don’t want to overwhelm the server with thousands of requests per second or you’ll get blocked. Thus, you need to impose an artificial limit of requests per second. This limit is usually based on server response time. Due to this artificial limit, most of the CPU or network resources of your server will be idle. Having a distributed crawler using thousands of machines will not make a focused crawl go any faster than running it on your laptop.

Architecture of a Web crawler.

In the case of broad crawl, the bottleneck is the performance and scalability of the crawler. Because you need to request pages from different domains you can potentially perform millions of requests per second without overwhelming a specific server. You are limited by the number of machines you have, their CPU, network bandwidth, and how well your crawler can make use of these resources.

If all you want it scrapes data from a couple of domains then looking for a web-scale crawler may be overkill. In this case take a look at services like import.io (from $299 monthly), which is great at scraping specific data items from web pages.

Scrapy (described below) is also an excellent choice for focused crawls.

Meet with Scrapy, Heritrix and Apache Nutch

Scrapy

Website: http://scrapy.org

Language: Python

Scrapy is a Python framework for web scraping. It does not have built-in functionality for running in a distributed environment so that it’s primary use case are focused crawls. That is not to say that Scrapy cannot be used for broad crawling, but other tools may be better suited for this purpose, particularly at a very large scale. According to the documentation the best practice to distribute crawls is to manually partition the URLs based on domain.

What stands out about Scrapy is its ease of use and excellent documentation. If you are familiar with Python you’ll be up and running in just a couple of minutes.

Scrapy has a couple of handy built-in export formats such as JSON, JSON lines, XML and CSV. Scrapy was built for extracting specific information from websites, not necessarily getting for a full dump of the HTML and indexing it. The latter requires some manual work to avoid writing the full HTML content of all pages to one gigantic output file. You would have to chunk the files manually.

Without the ability to run in a distributed environment, scale dynamically, or running continuos crawls, Scrapy is missing some of the key features I was looking for. However, if you need easy to use tool for extracting specific information from a couple of domains then Scrapy is nearly perfect. I’ve successfully used in in several projects and have been very happy with it.

Pros:

  • Easy to setup and use if you know Python
  • Excellent developer documentation
  • Built-in JSON, JSON lines, XML and CSV export formats

Cons:

  • No support for running in a distributed environment
  • No support for continuous crawls
  • Exporting large amounts of data is difficult

How to develop custom web crawler on Python for OLX? You can do it by guide from Adnan.


Heritrix

Website: webarchive.jira.com

Language: Java

Heritrix is developed, maintained, and used by The Internet Archive. Its architecture is described in this paper and largely based on that of the Mercator research project. Heritrix has been well-maintained ever since its release in 2004 and is being used in production by various other sites.

Heritrix runs in a distributed environment by hashing the URL hosts to appropriate machines. As such it is scalable, but not dynamically scalable. This means you must decide on the number of machines before you start crawling. If one of the machines goes down during your crawl you are out of luck.

The output format of Heritrix are WARC files that are written to the local file system. WARC is an efficient format for writing multiple resources (such as HTML) and their metadata into one archive file. Writing data to other data stores (or formats) is currently not supported, and it seems like doing so would require quite a few changes to the source code.

Continuous crawling is not supported, but apparently it is being worked on. However, as with many open source projects the turnaround time for new features can be quite long and I would not expect support for continuous crawls to be available anytime soon.

Heritrix is probably the most mature out of the source projects I looked it. I have found it easier to setup, configure and use than Nutch. At the same time it is more scalable and faster than scrapy. It ships together with a web frontend that can be used for monitoring and configuring crawls.

Pros:

  • Mature and stable platform. It has been in production use at archive.org for over a decade
  • Good performance and decent support for distributed crawls

Cons:

  • Does not support continuous crawling
  • Not dynamically scalable. This means, you must decide on the number of servers and partitioning scheme upfront
  • Exports ARC/WARC files. Adding support for custom backends would require changing the source

Further Reading:


Apache Nutch

Website: nutch.apache.org

Language: Java

Instead of building its own distributed system Nutch makes use of the Hadoop ecosystem and uses MapReduce for its processing ( details ). If you already have an existing Hadoop cluster you can simply point Nutch at it. If you don’t have an existing Hadoop cluster you will need to setup and configure one. Nutch inherits the advantages (such as fault-tolerance and scalability), but also the drawbacks (slow disk access between jobs due to the batch nature) of the Hadoop MapReduce architecture.

It is interesting to note that Nutch did not start out as a pure web crawler. It started as an open-source search engine that handles both crawling and indexing of web content. Even though Nutch has since become more of a web crawler, it still comes bundled with deep integration for indexing systems such as Solr (default) and ElasticSearch(via plugins). The newer 2.x branch of Nutch tries to separate the storage backend from the crawling component using Apache Gora, but is still in a rather early stage. In my own experiments I have found it to be rather immature and buggy. This means that if you are considering using Nutch you will probably be limited to combining it with Solr and ElasticSearch Web Crawler, or write your own plugin to support a different backend or export format.

Despite a lot of prior experience with Hadoop and Hadoop-based projects I have found Nutch quite difficult to setup and configure, mostly due to a lack of good documentation or real-world examples.

Nutch (1.x) seems to be a stable platform that is used in production by various organization, CommonCrawl among them. It has a flexible plugin system, allowing you to extend it with custom functionality. Indeed, this seems to be necessary for most use cases. When using Nutch you can expect spending quite a bit of time writing your own plugins or browsing through source code to make it fit your use case. If you have the time and expertise to do so then Nutch seems like a great platform to built upon.

Nutch does not currently support continuous crawls, but you could write a couple of scripts to emulate such functionality.

Pros:

  • Dynamically scalable (and fault-tolerant) through Hadoop
  • Flexible plugin system
  • Stable 1.x branch

Cons:

  • Bad documentation and confusing versioning. No examples.
  • Inherits disadvantages of Hadoop (disk reads, difficult setup)
  • No built-in support for continuous crawls
  • Export limited to Solr/ElasticSearch (on 1.x branch)

Further reading:


Conclusion

Open source web scrapers are quite powerful and extensible but are limited to developers. 

Not surprisingly, there isn’t a “perfect” web crawler out there. It’s all about picking the right one for your use case. Do you want to do a focused or a broad crawl? Do you have an existing Hadoop cluster (and knowledge in your team)? Where do you want your data to end up in?

Out of all the crawlers I have looked at Heritrix is probably my favorite, but it’s far from perfect. That’s probably why some people and organizations have opted to build their own crawler instead. That may be a viable alternative if none of the above fits your exact use case. If you’re thinking about building your own, I would highly recommend reading through the academic literature on web crawling, starting with these:

What are your experiences with web crawlers? What are you using and are you happy with it? Did I forget any? I only had limited time to evaluate each of the above crawlers, so it is very possible that I have overlooked some important features. If so, please let me know in the comments.

Do you Know What Google use Java?


Need Top 50 open source web crawlers List for data mining?

TOP 25 Hotels Websites for Families in the World

25 Examples of Inspiring Website Design

We no longer live in an age where a compelling and inspirational hotel website is a nice to have – now it is a must-have. If you aren’t online, your brand simply doesn’t exist to one of America’s most influential groups, millennials.  Meanwhile, as OTAs gather around the booking table for a slice of the pie, they bring with them gargantuan marketing budgets that most hotels can’t compete with. Hoteliers must level the playing field where they can, and for many, the best place to start is with their website. Only hotels and resorts truly know how to tell their stories and frame their unique value proposition to their guests.

1 Cavallino Bianco Family Spa Grand Hotel in Ortisei, Italy

  • The hotel, the spa, the restaurants, the services, the children’s water and play areas – the whole place is truly a fairytale land for all ages!

Premier Village Danang Resort – Managed by Accorhotels Da Nang, Vietnam

  • It’s a wonderful resort of Danang!!!
  • Best family resort choice for young ones

Santa Clara Eco Resort | Dourado, Brazil

  • Best weekend ever! Tons of fun activities, top-notch service
  • Hidden jewel in the middle of São Paulo State!

View deals

4 Homewood Suites by Hilton Anaheim Resort – Convention Center | Anaheim, California

  • Best Non Disney Disneyland Hotel
  • Exceptional Disney base – staff go above and beyond

View deals

5 Tulemar Bungalows & Villas | Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica

  • There were eight of us total (two families with kids ranging in age from 6 to 10), and we all agreed it was the best vacation we’d ever taken.

Check availability

6 Abra Havn | Kristiansand, Norway

  • AMAZING!
  • Fantastic place 

View deals

7 Isrotel Lagoona | Eilat, Israel

  • U23 ETU Triathlon Championships 
  • Uniq service 

View deals

8 Hotel Fazenda Mazzaropi | Taubate, Brazil

  • Perfect for children – and their family 
  • Paradise for kids (and as a result, parents too)

View deals

9 Rocking Horse Ranch Resort | Highland, New York

  • Great family getaway for all ages
  • The Whyte Family thanks you.

Check availability

10 LEGOLAND Feriendorf | Gunzburg, Germany

  • Fun experience with Legoland park
  • Just great!

View deals

How to make best hotel website?

The answer is using a website builder! These are user-friendly tools that allow you to create a website without needing to know even one single line of code.

  • Reservations Calendar
  • Room Search Bar
  • Newsletter
  • Mobile Friendly
  • Integration With TripAdvisor

11 Sani Club | Sani, Greece

  • Our October visit
  • Amazing holidays

View deals

12 Magic Natura Animal, Water Park & Polynesian Lodge Resort | Benidorm, Spain

  • Brilliant hotel, highly recommended 
  • Brilliant

View deals

13 Pegasos Royal | Incekum, Turkey

  • amazing holiday! cant wait to return
  • Second amazing visit to this amazing place!

View deals

14 The Reserve at Paradisus Palma Real | Punta Cana, Dominican Republic

  • Business trip
  • Short getaway

View deals

15 Club Family Hotel Executive | Cesenatico, Italy

  • Best for Kids and parents
  • Family hotel

Check availability

16 Kinderhotel Oberjoch | Oberjoch, Germany

  • Lovely hotel for kids and parents!
  • Great hotel, staff and location

Check availability

17 Meriton Suites World Tower, Sydney | Sydney, Australia

  • Awesome suite with amazing views
  • Great location, facilities and service

View deals

18 Voyage Sorgun | Sorgun, Turkey

  • Voyage sorgun the best hotel in Turkey
  • Best hotel I been

View deals

19 Chateau de Chine Hotel Hualien | Hualien, Taiwan

  • Great service and an excellent view of Hualien
  • Iconic Hotel in Hualien

View deals

20 Hotel Manar | Hammamet, Tunisia

  • Amazing
  • Keep the animation team

View deals

21 Padma Hotel Bandung | Bandung, Indonesia

  • It’s the people that make the difference 
  • Family Holiday

View deals

22 Beaches Negril Resort & Spa | Negril, Jamaica

  • Fantastic Family Trip
  • Jodian Williams

View deals

23 Barcelo Maya Colonial | Puerto Aventuras, Mexico

  • “EACH TRIP GETS BETTER!”
  • “Excellent”

View deals

24 Peppers Broadbeach | Broadbeach, Australia

  • Superb location. Ocean views just adds to the ambience
  • Great hotel in a great location with great restaurants

View deals

25 JA Oasis Beach Tower | Dubai, United Arab Emirates

  • Fantastic location and an incredible apartment!
  • Amazing place

View deals

If you have any questions about web development or are curious about whether or not your website could use a little help, don’t hesitate to ask. That is what Screen Pilot is here for after all.

TOP 10 Best Amazon Books for Web Developers

Front-End Web Development: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide (Big Nerd Ranch Guides)

Aug 8, 2016 — by Chris Aquino and Todd Gandee

$ 28,21

4.1 out of 5 stars 24

Front-end development targets the browser, putting your applications in front of the widest range of users regardless of device or operating system. This guide will give you a solid foundation for creating rich web experiences across platforms.

Focusing on JavaScript, CSS3, and HTML5, this book is for programmers with a background in other platforms and developers with previous web experience who need to get up to speed quickly on current tools and best practices.

Each chapter of this book will guide you through essential concepts and APIs as you build a series of applications. You will implement responsive UIs, access remote web services, build applications with Ember.js, and more. You will also debug and test your code with cutting-edge development tools and harness the power of Node.js and the wealth of open-source modules in the npm registry. After working through the step-by-step example projects, you will understand how to build modern websites and web applications.


No Degree Web Developer: How I broke into the tech industry with 3 months of self-taught programming.

May 8, 2017 — by Dom Xing

$ 12,99

4.3 out of 5 stars 7

So you want to become a web developer but you don’t have a computer science degree. If you’re reading this, then for whatever reason you’ve decided that it’s time to join the exciting world of tech. You’re determined and committed to join the fastest growing industry in the years to come. There’s one problem though. You have no idea where to start. Maybe you’ve done a little coding here and there or maybe you haven’t at all. Either way, it’d be really helpful if someone laid out exactly what you need to do to get that first foot in the door, and to do it fast. This book outlines the exact blueprint I used — from mindset to planning to job applications — to switch careers and land my first full-time gig as a web developer at a fast-growing global tech company. Now I’m getting paid to contribute to large projects with much more experienced developers who help me learn faster! In “No Degree Web Developer”, I cover: • General Attitude and Mindset • Technical Attitude and Mindset • Planning and Execution • Mentors • Getting a Job • Acceleration Hacks If you’re looking to break into the tech industry, or you just want a to-the-point guide on learning to code, check out “No Degree Web Developer” now!


Fundamentals of Web Development (2nd Edition)

Feb 18, 2017 — by Randy Connolly and Ricardo Hoar

$ 141,36

5 out of 5 stars 1

Fundamentals of Web Development , 2nd Edition guides readers through the creation of enterprise-quality websites using current development frameworks. Written by a leading teacher in the field and designed for serious programmers, this book is as valuable to developers as a dev bootcamp. Its practical approach and comprehensive insight into the practice of web development covers HTML5, CSS3, Javascript, and the LAMP stack (that is, Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP), jQuery, XML, WordPress, Bootstrap, and a variety of third-party APIs that include Facebook, Twitter, Google, and Bing Maps. Coverage also includes the required ACM web development topics, aligned with real-world web development best practices. The 2nd Edition faithfully covers the most vital trends and innovations in the field since 2013, while continuing to provide a thorough and comprehensive overview.


The Fundamentals of Web Development: Using HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript + Video Tutorials

Nov 16, 2015 — by Shelley Benhoff

$0.00

4.8 out of 5 stars 6

By the end of this course, you will be able to build a functional HTML web page from scratch. Learn the basic concepts and that you will need to build fully functional websites. Build a strong foundation of knowledge in HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript with this tutorial for beginners.

Learning HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript will help you begin a career in web development. These skills are the foundation for many other programming languages such as Microsoft .NET and PHP to create fully functional web applications.


Web Development with MongoDB and NodeJS

Oct 30, 2015 — by Mithun Satheesh and Bruno Joseph D’mello

$ 39,99

4.3 out of 5 stars 6

Node.js and MongoDB are quickly becoming one of the most popular tech stacks for the web. Powered by Google’s V8 engine, Node.js caters to easily building fast, scalable network applications while MongoDB is the perfect fit as a scalable, high-performance, open source NoSQL database solution. Using these two technologies together, web applications can be built quickly and easily and deployed to the cloud with very little difficulty.

The book will begin by introducing you to the groundwork needed to set up the development environment. Here, you will quickly run through the steps necessary to get the main application server up and running. Then you will see how to use Node.js to connect to a MongoDB database and perform data manipulations.

From here on, the book will take you through integration with third-party tools for interaction with web apps. It then moves on to show you how to use controllers and view models to generate reusable code that will reduce development time. Toward the end of the book, we will cover tests to properly execute the code and some popular frameworks for developing web applications.

By the end of the book, you will have a running web application developed with MongoDB and Node.js along with it’s popular frameworks.


MEAN Web Development

Sep 25, 2014 — by Amos Q. Haviv

$ 47,96

4.5 out of 5 stars 44

The MEAN stack is a collection of the most popular modern tools for web development; it comprises MongoDB, Express, AngularJS, and Node.js.

Starting with MEAN core frameworks, this project-based guide will explain the key concepts of each framework, how to set them up properly, and how to use popular modules to connect it all together. By following the real-world examples shown in this tutorial, you will scaffold your MEAN application architecture, add an authentication layer, and develop an MVC structure to support your project development. Finally, you will walk through the different tools and frameworks that will help expedite your daily development cycles.

Watch how your application development grows by learning from the only guide that is solely orientated towards building a full, end-to-end, real-time application using the MEAN stack!


How I Learned to Code: Lessons From Teaching Myself Web Development and Becoming a Paid Programmer in Only 3 Months

Sep 29, 2016 — by Mr Christopher R Dodd

$ 9,99

4 out of 5 stars 32

This book is the story of Chris’ 11 month journey from studying his first Ruby on Rails course to working remotely in Bali. Part-memoir and part-advice, Chris shares his experience as a junior developer including everything he learned along the way.

Including…
The Single Most Important Mindset You Will Need to Be Successful
How He Taught Himself to Code for FREE and How You Can Too
How He Got His First Job as a Paid Developer Within 3 Months & His Top Tips For Getting Hired
His ‘Secret Sauce’ When It Comes to Finding Freelance Clients, and
How He Was Able to Work Remotely From Bali

This book is essential reading for anyone considering a career in the fast-growing computer programming industry.


Identity and Data Security for Web Development: Best Practices

Jun 20, 2016 — by Jonathan LeBlanc and Tim Messerschmidt

$ 27,80

5 out of 5 stars 2

Developers, designers, engineers, and creators can no longer afford to pass responsibility for identity and data security onto others. Web developers who don’t understand how to obscure data in transmission, for instance, can open security flaws on a site without realizing it. With this practical guide, you’ll learn how and why everyone working on a system needs to ensure that users and data are protected.

Authors Jonathan LeBlanc and Tim Messerschmidt provide a deep dive into the concepts, technology, and programming methodologies necessary to build a secure interface for data and identity — without compromising usability. You’ll learn how to plug holes in existing systems, protect against viable attack vectors, and work in environments that sometimes are naturally insecure.

  • Understand the state of web and application security today
  • Design security password encryption, and combat password attack vectors
  • Create digital fingerprints to identify users through browser, device, and paired device detection
  • Build secure data transmission systems through OAuth and OpenID Connect
  • Use alternate methods of identification for a second factor of authentication
  • Harden your web applications against attack
  • Create a secure data transmission system using SSL/TLS, and synchronous and asynchronous cryptography

Building Websites All-in-One For Dummies

Aug 14, 2012 — by David Karlins and Doug Sahlin

$ 20,29

4.1 out of 5 stars 42

This hefty, 800+ page book is your start-to-finish roadmap for building a web site for personal or professional use. Even if you’re completely new to the process, this book is packed with everything you need to know to build an attractive, usable, and working site. In addition to being a thorough reference on the basics, this updated new edition also covers the very latest trends and tools, such as HTML5, mobile site planning for smartphones and tablets, connecting with social media, and more.

  • Packs ten minibooks into one hefty reference: Preparation, Site Design, Site Construction, Web Graphics, Multimedia, Interactive Elements, Form Management, Social Media Integration, Site Management, and Case Studies
  • Covers the newest trends and tools, including HTML5, the new Adobe Create Suite, and connecting with social media
  • Offers in-depth reviews and case studies of existing sites created for a variety of purposes and audiences, such as blog sites and non-profit sites
  • Walks you through essential technologies, including Dreamweaver, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP, and more

Plan, build, and maintain a site that does exactly what you need, with Building Web Sites All-In-One For Dummies, 3rd Edition.


Modern Web Development: Understanding domains, technologies, and user experience (Developer Reference)

Mar 2, 2016 — by Dino Esposito

$ 28,85

4.1 out of 5 stars 6

Master powerful new approaches to web architecture, design, and user experience
This book presents a pragmatic, problem-driven, user-focused approach to planning, designing, and building dynamic web solutions. You’ll learn how to gain maximum value from Domain-Driven Design (DDD), define optimal supporting architecture, and succeed with modern UX-first design approaches. The author guides you through choosing and implementing specific technologies and addresses key user-experience topics, including mobile-friendly and responsive design. You’ll learn how to gain more value from existing Microsoft technologies such as ASP.NET MVC and SignalR by using them alongside other technologies such as Bootstrap, AJAX, JSON, and JQuery. By using these techniques and understanding the new ASP.NET Core 1.0, you can quickly build advanced web solutions that solve today’s problems and deliver an outstanding user experience.

Microsoft MVP Dino Esposito shows you how to:

  • Plan websites and web apps to mirror real-world social and business processes
  • Use DDD to dissect and master the complexity of business domains
  • Use UX-Driven Design to reduce costs and give customers what they want
  • Realistically compare server-side and client-side web paradigms
  • Get started with the new ASP.NET Core 1.0
  • Simplify modern visual webpage construction with Bootstrap
  • Master practical, efficient techniques for running ASP.NET MVC projects
  • Consider new options for implementing persistence and working with data models
  • Understand Responsive Web Design’s pros, cons, and tradeoffs
  • Build truly mobile-friendly, mobile-optimized websites

About This Book

  • For experienced developers and solution architects who want to plan and develop web solutions more effectively
  • Assumes basic familiarity with the Microsoft web development stack