Connect with us

Web Development

Most Common WordPress Issues

Published

on

Most Common WordPress Issues

Creating a website is one of the first and most important steps that online business owners will take. Many people end up choosing WordPress to build their websites due to its user-friendliness. WordPress is a great option, but there are a few common errors to be aware of in case you encounter them in the future.

Make a Backup

When you notice an issue on your website, you may have a temptation to resolve the problem right away. Before you take any action, it is a strong recommendation to make a backup of your WordPress site. This is to ensure that you do not lose any data if the attempted resolution fails. Several plugins offer backup services, or you could perform a manual backup instead. 

WordPress Issues

1. Slow Speeds

Due to the short attention span of most online visitors, it has become more important than ever for websites to load quickly. If a customer needs to wait more than three seconds for a page to load, they are very likely to navigate away and find a competing product instead.  

There are a few different methods of solving the problem. First, check your hosting provider’s website. A server may be undergoing maintenance, and the provider will likely post an estimated time of completion. 

Another possibility is that your website has outgrown its hosting plan. Talk to your provider about upgrading to a new, reliable WordPress hosting plan that will suit your needs better. A WordPress hosting plan will optimize your website and provide you with features such as one-click installation, auto-updates, enhanced security, and support from experts in the field. 

2. “White Death” Error

When your WordPress displays a blank screen, this is primarily known as either a “White Screen of Death”, or a “White Death” for short. This error indicates that the site was not able to load, and it can be tricky to troubleshoot because there are multiple possibilities. The most likely culprit is a broken plugin. 

If you just downloaded a new plugin, the resolution to the problem may be simple. Login to your admin area and navigate to your plugins. Deactivate the plugin you recently acquired and test your web page again. If that was the cause, you should submit a support ticket to the plugin’s developer to let them know there was a problem. If that was not the cause, you could try deactivating all your plugins at once to eliminate them from being the issue. Do a test, and then reactivate them if the problem is not fixed. 

Another potential solution is to clear your cache. After an update, the cache may still be displaying out-of-date files. This is simple to do if you have a cache plugin, as there will be a button in the admin toolbar. Simply hover over the button, and the option to purge the cache will appear. 

3. Internal Server Error

Encountering an internal server error is an indication of a corrupted .htaccess file. This is the file that contains server instructions that allow for configurations of your website. The file can become corrupt due to the installation of a plugin or if the internet drops during a change to the website. 

You will need to log into your site root directory to repair this. Here you will have access to your WordPress installation, and you can change the name of your .htaccess file. Rename it to .htaccess_old. Save your changes in the settings – permalinks area, and then check that the issue is now solved. If it is, you can delete the old .htaccess file, as a new one will generate to replace it. 

4. Issues with Uploading Media

Sometimes, while uploading media in the admin area, you may encounter an HTTP error. This will pop up on the side of your screen in a small box. Luckily, this issue tends to have a simple resolution. You may have left your session open too long and it expired. Refresh the page and then try again. 

Otherwise, there may be an issue with the media file itself. It could be too large, or it could have disallowed characters in its name. Try renaming it, and then resizing it to solve the problem. 

5. Unsecure Site

While testing your site, you may notice a warning of “Not Secure” beside the URL. This indicates that your website does not have an SSL certificate. An SSL certificate will ensure that the data transmitted between the server and the browsers of visitors remains encrypted and secure. There is a reduced chance that hackers can infiltrate the data and steal the information of customers. 

Having an SSL certificate is important because it demonstrates to customers your dedication to protecting their personal information. A customer will be far more likely to purchase something from a secure website as opposed to an unsecured one. 

Wrapping Up

The above are five of the most common WordPress errors you may encounter during your business operations. If you cannot find your specific error or a resolution, try reaching out to your web hosting provider, as they might be able to walk you through the solution.   

Trending